Rethinking How the Beverages You Drink Affect Your Teeth

Many people are pretty careful about what they eat and how it will affect their teeth. They avoid sugary and acidic foods, brush and floss regularly, and see the dentist for regular cleanings. But what about the beverages you drink? It turns out that the drinks you enjoy every day can have a big impact on your oral health. Here’s a closer look at how some common beverages can affect your teeth.

1. Coffee

Coffee is the most popular beverage in America, with 66% of people consuming it every day. In fact, Americans now drink coffee more than any other beverage, including tap water, up by almost 14% since January 2021. But what does coffee do to your teeth?

Coffee is acidic, which can wear down your tooth enamel over time. It can also cause staining, particularly if you drink it regularly. If you’re a coffee lover, there are some things you can do to minimize the impact on your teeth. Rinse your mouth with water after drinking coffee to help remove any residual acidity. And be sure to brush your teeth regularly to help keep them healthy and strong.

2. Soda

Soda is another popular beverage, but it’s one that can be particularly damaging to your teeth. Soda is high in sugar and acidity, both of which can contribute to tooth decay. In fact, studies have shown that people who drink soda regularly are more likely to develop cavities than those who don’t.

If you enjoy soda, there are some things you can do to protect your teeth. Drink it with a straw to help minimize contact with your teeth. And be sure to brush your teeth soon after drinking to help remove any sugar or acid that may be left behind.

3. Well Water

According to experts, over 13 million homes in the United States get their drinking water from private wells. While well water is generally safe to drink, it can contain high levels of minerals like fluoride and calcium.

While these minerals are important for oral health, too much of them can lead to problems like fluorosis and dental calculus. If you have a private well, be sure to have your water regularly tested to ensure that it meets safety standards. Remember, modern labs can now screen for ingredients to a very low level: 0.1% or lower.

If your well water is high in minerals, there are some things you can do to protect your teeth. Use a water filter to remove excess minerals from your water before you drink it. And be sure to visit your dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.

4. Alcohol

While moderate consumption of alcohol is generally safe, excessive drinking can lead to a number of health problems, including tooth decay. Alcohol is a sugar-based substance, so it can contribute to the development of cavities. It’s also dehydrating, which can make your mouth more susceptible to bacteria and infection.

If you drink alcohol, there are some things you can do to protect your teeth. One, try and cut down on your consumption. Two, drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. And three, brush your teeth regularly to help remove any sugar or acid that may be left behind.

5. Energy Drinks

Energy drinks are becoming increasingly popular, especially among young adults. Children who participate in sports are also exposed to these beverages at a very early age. But what impact do they have on our teeth?

Energy drinks are high in sugar and acidity, both of which can contribute to tooth decay. They can also cause staining and erosion of tooth enamel. If you drink energy drinks, whether to stay up all night studying or working or to get ready for a sports game, ensure you brush your teeth regularly to help keep your mouth healthy.

A closer look at how some common beverages can affect your teeth. Be sure to keep these tips in mind next time you reach for a cup of coffee, a can of soda, or a glass of well water. And remember, if you have any concerns about your oral health, be sure to visit your dentist for a checkup.